A Nation Dedicated to Religious Liberty by Arlin M. Adams

By Arlin M. Adams

Here's a concise review of the ancient improvement and judicial interpretation of the 1st modification faith clauses. It starts with a survey of the heritage of yankee non secular liberty, is going directly to current the perspectives of the Founding Fathers, after which considers the center worth of spiritual liberty and the constitutional reasons that enforce that worth.

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A Nation Dedicated to Religious Liberty

Here's a concise review of the historic improvement and judicial interpretation of the 1st modification faith clauses. It starts off with a survey of the background of yankee non secular liberty, is going directly to current the perspectives of the Founding Fathers, after which considers the middle worth of non secular liberty and the constitutional reasons that enforce that worth.

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In considering the meaning of the religion clauses, chapter 1 of this book will survey the history of American religious liberty, chapter 2 will examine the Founding Fathers' views, chapter 3 will discuss the core value of religious liberty, and chapter 4 will identify the constitutional principles that implement this value. 3 To this end, chapter 5 will apply these principles, by way of example, to three current issues: the voluntary meeting of student religious groups in public high schools, known as the equal-access controversy; religious symbolism in public life, particularly the inclusion of invocations and benedictions in high school graduations; and the task of defining religion for constitutional purposes.

1 The First Amendment of the United States Constitution declares, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof. . "2 This provision, known as the religion clauses, contains two prohibitions against Congress: the first is referred to as the establishment clause, the second as the free exercise clause. The sixteen words of the clauses, so simple yet capable of so many different interpretations, have sparked intense contemporary debate.

Finally, we appreciate the thoughtful assistance of the University of Pennsylvania Press, especially Arthur Evans, former Associate Director, and Ernie Gonsalves, Business Manager of the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Page 1 Introduction Recognizing that an examination of history can be hazardous as well as fruitful, we will address the historical meaning of a constitutional provision that represents one of America's great contributions to Western civilization. 1 The First Amendment of the United States Constitution declares, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.

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